September 29, 2020

Solution for Managing Type 2 Diabetes, Pre-Diabetes, Overweight, and Obesity

Pre-diabetes, as well as full-blown type 2 diabetes are on the increase, so much so that in 2010 the World Health Organization (WHO) issued a mandate for all nations to take action to combat the spread. In 2015, The International Diabetes Federation reported that more than 400 million people were living with diabetes. Experts predict that if this trend continues, by the year 2040, 1.8 billion people around the world will be diabetic. This article and the research cited within focuses on the growing recognition by diabetes researchers that the consumption of sugar sweetened beverages (SSBs) and foods high in sugar content may be a main cause of pre-diabetes, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), overweight, and obesity. A practical and natural solution is also being given for tackling these conditions.

Diabetes type 2 and sugar

Normally, sugar is converted into the simple sugar, glucose. Then, insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, assists in moving the glucose into the cells of the body. A normally functioning pancreas adjusts the amount of insulin produced based on the level of glucose in the blood. If one has diabetes, blood sugar levels become too high and a healthy or normal balance is lost. My research has found that type 2 diabetes commonly occurs when Diabetes Freedom Customer Reviews 2020 consumes an excess amount of refined sugar over an extended period. Unlike with type 1 diabetes, where the pancreas produces very little or no insulin, with type 2 diabetes, the pancreas produces an adequate amount of insulin, but the cells are resistant to the hormone.Supreme Court rules in favour of inventor in Unilever diabetes ...

Research Linking Sugar Consumption to the Weight Gain and Increase in Cases of Type 2 Diabetes

According to Dr. Sanjay Basu Ph.D., an Epidemiologist from Stanford University cited in the Stanford Medicine newsletter in an article written by Digitale (2013): Researchers from Stanford University School of Medicine, the University of California-Berkley and the University of California-San Francisco examined data on sugar availability and diabetes rates from 175 countries over the past decade. After counting for obesity and a large array of other factors, the researchers found that increased sugar in a population’s food supply was linked to higher diabetes rates, independent of obesity rates.

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